Course Description

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

Unit Titles and DescriptionsTime Allocated
Dynamics

Students will review concepts essential to their success in the course: scientific notation, significant digits, vector operations, and fundamental mathematical tools. Principles of kinematics and free body diagrams will also be reviewed and extended. By the end of the unit, students will demonstrate and understanding of the forces involved in uniform circular motion and motion in a plane. They will have investigated forces involved in these modes of motion and have solved related problems. They will analyse technological devices that apply the principles of dynamics of motion, with particular respect to the effect of g-forces on the human body.

22 hours
Energy and Momentum

Students will demonstrate an understanding of work, energy, momentum. Drawing from Grade 10 concepts of the laws of conservation of energy, they will extend these ideas to conservation of momentum in one and two dimensions. Through computer simulation and other modes of inquiry they will investigate these phenomena and solve related problems. They will conduct analyses and propose improvements to technologies and procedures that apply principles related to energy and momentum, and assess the social and environmental impact of these.

20 hours
Gravitational, Electric and Magnetic Fields

By the end of this unit, students will demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, properties, principles and laws related to gravitational, electric and magnetic fields, particularly with respect to their interactions with matter. They will investigate these phenomena graphically and through use of other electronic models. They will analyse the operation of technologies that use these fields, and discuss the social and environmental impact of these technologies.

22 hours
The Wave Nature of Light

Building upon concepts developed during Grade 10, students will study light with particular respect to its wave nature. Properties of waves will be discussed in a general sense, and the principles of diffraction, refraction, interference and polarization will be investigated theoretically and through simulation. Technologies that make use of the knowledge of the wave nature of light, and their social and environmental impacts, will be discussed.

22 hours
Revolutions in Modern Physics: Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity

In this unit, some of the most exciting and counterintuitive concepts in physics, including Einstein’s ideas about relativity, photoelectric effect, and particle physics, will be examined. Quantum mechanics and special relativity will be investigated mathematically and related problems will be solved. In light of the revolutionary ideas studied in this unit, students will discuss how the introduction of new conceptual models can influence and change scientific thought, and lead to the development of new technologies.

21 hours
Final Assessment
Exam

This is a proctored exam worth 30% of your final grade.

3 hours
Total110 hours

Resources required by the student:

Note: This course is entirely online and does not require or rely on any textbook.

  • A non-programmable, non-graphing, scientific calculator.
  • A scanner, smart phone camera, or similar device to upload handwritten or hand-drawn work

Resources provided by ICE:

  • Online calculator

Overall Curriculum Expectations

A. Scientific Investigation Skills and Career Exploration
A1demonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four areas of skills (initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communicating);
A2identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study, and identify scientists, including Canadians, who have made contributions to those fields.
B. Dynamics
B1analyse technological devices that apply the principles of the dynamics of motion, and assess the technologies’ social and environmental impact;
B2investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, forces involved in uniform circular motion and motion in a plane, and solve related problems;
B3demonstrate an understanding of the forces involved in uniform circular motion and motion in a plane.
C. Energy and Momentum
C1analyse, and propose ways to improve, technologies or procedures that apply principles related to energy and momentum, and assess the social and environmental impact of these technologies or procedures;
C2investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, through laboratory inquiry or computer simulation, the relationship between the laws of conservation of energy and conservation of momentum, and solve related problems;
C3demonstrate an understanding of work, energy, momentum, and the laws of conservation of energy and conservation of momentum, in one and two dimensions.
D. Gravitational, Electric and Magnetic Fields
D1analyse the operation of technologies that use gravitational, electric, or magnetic fields, and assess the technologies’ social and environmental impact;
D2investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields, and solve related problems;
D3demonstrate an understanding of the concepts, properties, principles, and laws related to gravitational, electric, and magnetic fields and their interactions with matter.
E. The Wave Nature of Light
E1analyse technologies that use the wave nature of light, and assess their impact on society and the environment;
E2investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, the properties of waves and light, and solve related problems;
E3demonstrate an understanding of the properties of waves and light in relation to diffraction, refraction, interference, and polarization.
F. Revolutions in Modern Physics: Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity
F1analyse, with reference to quantum mechanics and relativity, how the introduction of new conceptual models and theories can influence and/or change scientific thought and lead to the development of new technologies;
F2investigate special relativity and quantum mechanics, and solve related problems;
F3demonstrate an understanding of the evidence that supports the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and Einstein’s theory of special relativity.

 

 

Teaching & Learning Strategies:

The over-riding aim of this course is to help students learn science and apply their knowledge and skills. Course writers effectively use language skillfully, confidently and flexibly. Effective instructional approaches and learning activities draw on students’ prior knowledge, capture their interest, and encourage meaningful practice. Students will be engaged when they are able to see the connection between the scientific concepts they are learning and their application in the world around them and in real-life situations. Teachers will provide activities and challenges that actively engage students in inquiries that honour the ideas and skills students bring to them, while further deepening their conceptual understandings and essential skills. Understanding of big ideas will enable and encourage students to use scientific thinking throughout their lives. As well, contextualized teaching and learning provides teachers with useful insights into their students’ thinking, their understanding of concepts, and their ability to reflect on what they have done. This insight allows teachers to provide supports to help enhance students’ learning. A wide variety of instructional strategies are used to provide learning opportunities to accommodate a variety of learning styles, interests and ability levels.

Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting Strategies of Student Performance:

Our theory of assessment and evaluation follows the Ministry of Education’s Growing Success document, and it is our firm belief that doing so is in the best interests of students. We seek to design assessment in such a way as to make it possible to gather and show evidence of learning in a variety of ways to gradually release responsibility to the students, and to give multiple and varied opportunities to reflect on learning and receive detailed feedback.

Growing Success articulates the vision the Ministry has for the purpose and structure of assessment and evaluation techniques. There are seven fundamental principles that ensure best practices and procedures of assessment and evaluation by ICE teachers. ICE assessments and evaluations,

  • are fair, transparent, and equitable for all students;
  • support all students, including those with special education needs, those who are learning the language of instruction (English or French), and those who are First Nation, Métis, or Inuit;
  • are carefully planned to relate to the curriculum expectations and learning goals and, as much as possible, to the interests, learning styles and preferences, needs, and experiences of all students;
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other points throughout the school year or course;
  • are ongoing, varied in nature, and administered over a period of time to provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • provide ongoing descriptive feedback that is clear, specific, meaningful, and timely to support improved learning and achievement;
  • develop students’ self-assessment skills to enable them to assess their own learning, set specific goals, and plan next steps for their learning.

The Final Grade:

The evaluation for this course is based on the student’s achievement of curriculum expectations and the demonstrated skills required for effective learning. The final percentage grade represents the quality of the student’s overall achievement of the expectations for the course and reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline. A credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade will be determined as follows:

  • 70% of the grade will be based upon evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • 30% of the grade will be based on final evaluations administered at the end of the course. The final assessment may be a final exam, a final project, or a combination of both an exam and a project.

The Report Card:

Student achievement will be communicated formally to students via an official report card. Report cards are issued at the midterm point in the course, as well as upon completion of the course. Each report card will focus on two distinct, but related aspects of student achievement. First, the achievement of curriculum expectations is reported as a percentage grade. Additionally, the course median is reported as a percentage. The teacher will also provide written comments concerning the student’s strengths, areas for improvement, and next steps. Second, the learning skills are reported as a letter grade, representing one of four levels of accomplishment. The report card also indicates whether an OSSD credit has been earned. Upon completion of a course, ICE will send a copy of the report card back to the student’s home school (if in Ontario) where the course will be added to the ongoing list of courses on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. The report card will also be sent to the student’s home address.

Program Planning Considerations:

Teachers who are planning a program in this subject will make an effort to take into account considerations for program planning that align with the Ontario Ministry of Education policy and initiatives in a number of important areas.

Planning Programs for Students with Special Education Needs, Program Considerations for, English Language Learners, Environmental Education, Healthy Relationships, Equity and, Inclusive Education, Financial Literacy Education, Literacy, Mathematical Literacy, and Inquiry Skills, Critical Thinking and Critical Literacy, The Role of the School Library, The Role of Information and Communications Technology, The Ontario Skills Passport: Making Learning Relevant and Building Skills, Education and Career/Life Planning, Cooperative Education and Other Forms of Experiential Learning, Planning Program Pathways and Programs Leading to a Specialist High Skills Major, Health and Safety, Ethics.

Course Curriculum

1. Dynamics
SPH4U Dynamics- L1 Intro to Kinematics 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L2 Graphs of Motion 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L3 2D Motion Practice 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L3 Equations of Motion 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L3 Vector Basics 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L4 Friction 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L5 Centripetal Acceleration 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L5 Intro to Projectile Motion 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L6 Centripetal Force 00:00:00
SPH4U Dynamics- L8 Kepler’s Laws 00:00:00
Eggceleration Lab10, 00:00
Dynamics10, 00:00
SPH4U Kinematics Test 02:40:00
2. Energy and Momentum
SPH4U Energy and Momentum- L1 1.0 Intro to Work and Energy 00:00:00
SPH4U Energy and Momentum- L2 Hookes Law Elastic Potential 00:00:00
SPH4U Energy and Momentum- L3 Conservation of Energy 00:00:00
SPH4U Energy and Momentum- L4 Elastic and Inelastic 00:00:00
SPH4U Energy and Momentum- L5 Special Case Elastic Collisions 00:00:00
SPH4U Energy and Momentum- L6 Momentum and Impulse 00:00:00
SPH4U Energy and Momentum- L7 Elastic vs Inelastic Collisions1 00:00:00
Work and Energy10, 00:00
Momentum10, 00:00
SPH4U Energy Test 02:40:00
3. Magnets and Fields
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L1 Gravitational Fields 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L1 Gravitational Potential Energy and Escape Speed Questions1 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L1 Orbits and Keplers Laws 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L2 Charges and Forces 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L3 Electric Fields 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L3 Electric Potential Energy and Electric Potential 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L4 Millikan and Motion of Charges 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L5 Magnetism and Electromagnetism 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L5 Magnetic Force on Moving Charges1 00:00:00
SPH4U Magnets and Fields- L6 Amperes Law and Electromagnetic Induction 00:00:00
Magnets Test 02:40:00
Electric and Magnetic Field Test 02:40:00
4. Wave Nature of Light
SPH4U Wave Nature of Light- L1 Intro to Waves 00:00:00
SPH4U Wave Nature of Light- L1 Properties of Waves and Light 00:00:00
SPH4U Wave Nature of Light- L2 Differaction and Interference of Water Wave 00:00:00
SPH4U Wave Nature of Light- L3 Youngs Double Slit Experiment 00:00:00
SPH4U Wave Nature of Light- L4 Em-Waves 00:00:00
SPH4U Wave Nature of Light- L5 Polarization of Light Worksheets 00:00:00
SPH4U Wave Nature of Light- L6 Single Slite Differaction 00:00:00
Assignment- Research Light as Wave10, 00:00
Wave Nature of Light Test 02:00:00
5. Modern Physics
SPH4U Modern Physics- L1 Overview 00:00:00
SPH4U Modern Physics- L2 Intro to Special Relativity 00:00:00
SPH4U Modern Physics- L3 Simultaneity and Time Dilation 00:00:00
SPH4U Modern Physics- L4 Length Contraction and Relativistic Momentum 00:00:00
SPH4U Modern Physics- L5 E=mc2 00:00:00
Final Assignment10, 00:00
Unit5 Test 00:00:00
1 STUDENTS ENROLLED

Welcome to ICE

ICE is an independent Private High School that helps students to achieve their High School Diploma. Our School is authorized by the Ontario Ministry of Education to grant credits for secondary students in Grades 9-12, who are working to complete their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD).
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